2017 Summer Reading Requirements


Each student will be required to read one novel and complete the summer reading assignment by Wednesday, August 9.  Also, the students will start presenting summer reading assignments on Thursday, August 10.  The summer reading assignment is worth 100 points, 25 points for the five questions (Part I) and 75 points for the project and presentation (Part II).

AP English Language and Composition, taken by some juniors, has a second summer reading book and assignment.  This assignment link is posted below.  In addition to reading Frankenstein and completing the summer reading assignment given to all other juniors, AP English Language and Composition juniors will read How to Read Literature Like a Professor, Revised Edition, and complete the assignment below.

AP English Literature, taken by some seniors, requires completion of the AP English Literature summer reading assignment.  This assignment link is posted below.  AP English Literature seniors are not required to complete the general summer reading assignment given to all other seniors pertaining to The Namesake.  AP English Literature seniors will only complete the AP English Literature assignment.  This assignment link is posted below.

*All hard copies and digital copies (digital if your assignment choice has a digital element, like the History Lesson option), of the summer reading assignment are due Wednesday, August 9. All written elements of your project need to be in hard copy form in order to turn in on Wednesday, August 9. 

Students will also be given an essay assignment, pertaining to the summer novel, during the first quarter of the semester. The essay is worth an additional 100 points. 

  • Freshmen (all levels): The Alchemist, Paulo Coelho 
  • Sophomore (all levels): Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck 
  • Junior (all levels): Frankenstein, 3rd edition, 1831, Mary Shelley 
  • *AP English Language and Composition additional book, How to Read Literature Like a Professor, Revised Edition, Thomas C. Foster
    • Click here for a copy of the writing assignment for AP English Language and Composition-JUNIORS.
  • Senior (all levels except AP English Literature): The Namesake, Jhumpa Lahiri 
  • *AP English Literature: Things Fall Apart, Chinua Achebe, either The Namesake OR Yellow Raft on Blue Water and one other novel/play from a list of over 50 titles posted online.
    •  Click here for a copy of the writing assignment for AP English Literature-SENIORS.
  • AP additional assignments are also due on Wednesday, August 9.

The summer reading assignment consists of two parts. The first part will mostly be completed while you are reading the novel. The second part will mostly be completed after you finish reading the novel. Both parts should be finished by Wednesday, August 9, and Part I will be turned in on Wednesday, August 9.  You must have a typed hard copy of Part I to turn in on Wednesday, August 9.

 

Please click here for a printable version of the 2017 Summer Reading Assignment.

 

Part I 

At least one paragraph is required for each answer. Answers will reflect a response to a variety of sections of the novel. Here are the five questions:   

  1. If you could change one action by one character in the novel, what character and action would you choose? Why? How would your change alter the novel as a whole?     
  2. What part of the novel did you have the strongest reaction to while reading? This response could be sadness, anger, excitement or another emotion. Why did you react strongly to that particular part of the novel?     
  3. While reading the novel, what did you predict incorrectly? What did you correctly predict? For instance, what part of the novel was not surprising and what part of the novel surprised you the most?     
  4. What will you always remember about this particular novel? This can be something that happened in the plot, a particular character or even a memorable visual. Why was it memorable to you?     
  5. What option did you choose for your summer reading project? Briefly describe your project and why you chose that option.  

 

ParT II

Choose one of the nine project assignments from the following list. You will present your project to your English class in a 3-5 minute presentation starting on the first full week of class. Be prepared to answer questions regarding the novel and your project during your presentation.

1. Storyboard

Create a visual outline, a storyboard, of the major plot points and events in the novel. You will use images, at least five quotes, and other aspects of the major elements of the novel for your storyboard. You will present your storyboard to the class and be able to fully explain your storyboard. Be ready to answer questions not only about your choices for your storyboard, but also the novel in general.  Remember to think about how to make your storyboard stand out. Write one typed page justifying the events, quotes, and images included in your storyboard while also explaining their significance.  The typed page must be printed and ready to turn in on Wednesday, August 9.  Remember if you choose a visual project, your project should look visually appealing and show a great amount of effort.  And remember that a storyboard is different from a timeline.

2. Comic Strip   

Create a comic strip from a specific character’s point of view, using specific plot elements and quotes from the novel. Use speech bubbles as well as captions for your comic strip.  The text of the comic strip is important.  Write  one typed page explaining the significance of your comic strip, why you chose to highlight a particular section of the novel in your comic strip, and the significance of your comic strip in relation to the novel as a whole. Also, be able to explain your page explanation in your presentation without just reading it to the class.  The typed page must be printed and ready to turn in on Wednesday, August 9.  Be ready to answer questions about the novel and your comic strip.  Remember if you choose a visual project, your project should look visually appealing and show a great amount of effort.  And remember that a storyboard is different from a timeline.

3. Timeline  

Create a timeline with images, specifically focused on significant plot points, why they are significant, how they are connected, how they show cause and effect for events in the novel, and how they show character development. Your timeline should contain details and at least five quotes from the novel. You will present your timeline to the class. Write one typed page explaining your timeline and the significance of your choices for the timeline, including the connections and the cause and effect elements on your timeline. Be specific. The typed page must be printed and ready to turn in on Wednesday, August 9. Be ready to answer questions about what you highlighted in your timeline and about the novel. Remember if you choose a visual project, your project should look visually appealing and show a great amount of effort. And remember that a timeline is different from a storyboard.   

4. Book Cover (Option for FRESHMEN only)

Design a front cover and back cover for the novel. Include images, significant quotes, plot elements, and character information while highlighting specific themes and conflicts in the novel. Write a paragraph about the novel on the back cover. Look at actual book covers to help you with how to organize your project. Do not use clip art or Google images. You will present your book covers by explaining how they reflect the theme, conflict, messages, and characters in the novel. Also, you will type a one-­‐‑ page analysis explaining your cover and each element you chose (images, colors, font, etc.) and why. The typed page must be printed and ready to turn in on Wednesday, August 9. Be prepared to answer questions about your book covers and the novel. Remember if you choose a visual project, your project should look visually appealing and show a great amount of effort.

5. Travel Brochure   

Create a travel brochure, including a front and a back, using images of places within the book. Use tone, mood, setting, and significance of setting in your brochure. Think about all of the different aspects of setting in the novel. For instance, is the setting in a specific city, state, country, or time period? Is the setting mostly indoor, outdoor, urban or rural? Present your brochure to the class and be ready to answer questions regarding your brochure and how it represents the novel. Also, be ready to answer general questions about the novel. Write one typed page explaining your choices for your travel brochure and their significances. The typed page must be printed and ready to turn in on Wednesday, August 9. Remember if you choose a visual project, your project should look visually appealing and show a great amount of effort.  

6. History Lesson

Using the novel and historical research, create a presentation explaining an important issue from the time period of the novel. Explain how the time period is significant in relation to the novel. Your presentation should include images to enhance the presentation. Be sure to connect the history to specifics in the novel, and be prepared to answer questions about the novel and your research. Remember to print your slides to turn in on the due date, also. Remember if you choose a visual project, your project should look visually appealing and show a great amount of effort. Your history lesson should be thorough and filled with details. Since you will be using outside sources, provide a list of your sources on your final slide.   

7. Correspondence  

Taking on the persona of one or more characters in the novel, write at least ten postcards (two-­‐‑sided, including appropriate and fitting image/s and text) that the character/s could possibly write during the course of the novel in response to events in the plot. Postcards can be written between characters or from one character to the other or from one character to an unknown recipient, or any combination of these. Use specifics from the novel to legitimize your postcards, thinking about how the characters would write and what they would say and how they would say it in their own correspondence. Be prepared to answer questions about your project and the novel. Remember if you choose a visual project, your project should look visually appealing and show a great amount of effort.   

8. Newspaper or Newscast  

Create the front page of a newspaper using the novel as inspiration. You will need to provide pictures, appropriate headlines and write news articles (could have character interviews) to capture the tone and happenings of the novel. Or, you may write a fake newscast regarding the novel in the same way, using the tone and significant moments in the novel. This may either be read live in class or recorded and shown to the class as a video newscast. Be prepared to answer questions on the parts of the novel you chose to highlight as newsworthy and other questions regarding the novel. Remember if you choose a visual project, your project should look visually appealing and show a great amount of effort.   

9. Playlist

Create a playlist to correspond with the novel. Choose songs that represent two of the main characters, two major moments in the novel, and the overall tone of the novel. Therefore, the playlist should include five clips from five different songs. Presentations must be organized by using a slide show, PowerPoint presentation, iMovie, or a similar format, and specific sections of the songs will be played during your presentation. You will play short clips from the school-­‐‑appropriate songs and fully explain how they represent the characters, moments, and tone through the lyrics and the music. Explanations for song choices will be typed and turned in, so you will have at least one typed paragraph explanation per song, totalling at least five paragraphs. The typed paragraphs must be printed and ready to turn in on Wednesday, August 9. Remember your presentation should be 3-­‐‑5 minutes total. You need to have your presentation and songs ready, you will not be allowed to find songs as you go, or go over the time limit. Be prepared to answer additional questions about your project and the novel in general.. 

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